Iceland Tourism Prepares for a Comeback

This year, the Icelandic federal government is investing approximately 1.7 billion Icelandic krona (about $12.3 million) in facilities at both private and public traveler spots across the nation, stated Skarphedinn Berg Steinarsson, director general of the Icelandic Tourist Board. Roughly 1 billion krona has actually been set aside for facilities at national parks, secured areas and large public traveler websites, while 700 million krona is going into the countrys Tourist Site Protection Fund.
The improvements at tourist websites have two objectives, Mr. Steinarsson said in an interview, “allowing them to get larger numbers– producing parking spaces, strolling courses, etc.– but likewise maintaining the nature to make certain that the websites will not be used down when we get the visitors back.”
The largest grants from the Tourist Site Protection Fund are supporting the construction of a viewing platform on Bolafjall Mountain in the Westfjords, he said, along with facilities at Studlagil Canyon, where a seeing platform is being set up along with brand-new pathways, toilets and details signs. These improvements are meant to keep travelers safe (the Bolafjall site includes a steep cliff), while also safeguarding the landscape from environmental damage and enhancing the general visitor experience.
The Studlagil Canyon is an example of a phenomenon that is not unusual in Iceland: a site that was produced not by the hosts, but by the visitors. The canyon– which features significant basalt-column cliffs lining the banks of a glacial-fed river– was “discovered” as an appealing destination just recently, Mr. Steinarsson said, after the rivers circulation was made much calmer following the construction of a close-by hydroelectric plant.
” This is one of those websites that are developed on social media,” Mr. Steinarsson said. “But theres no infrastructure there, no parking sites, no toilets.
Now the federal government is dealing with the owners of the land to construct pathways, parking areas and toilets. The goal, Mr. Steinarsson said, is to ensure that visitors can take pleasure in the site “without spoiling anything.”
The type of facilities being set up at Studlagil is currently in location at many of Icelands more established locations, especially in the Golden Circle– an area not far from Reykjavik that includes some of the nations most well-known tourist locations: Gullfoss waterfall, Geysir Geothermal Area and Thingvellir National Park, to name a few spots. While the facilities in those areas is already relatively good, Mr. Steinarsson said, any areas that are particularly delicate will need consistent upkeep– and funding– to safeguard against damage from visitors.

This year, the Icelandic federal government is investing approximately 1.7 billion Icelandic krona (about $12.3 million) in facilities at both private and public tourist spots across the nation, said Skarphedinn Berg Steinarsson, director general of the Icelandic Tourist Board. Roughly 1 billion krona has been set aside for facilities at national parks, protected locations and large public traveler sites, while 700 million krona is going into the countrys Tourist Site Protection Fund. “But theres no facilities there, no parking sites, no toilets.