Now Is Not the Time to Travel to Indigenous Nations in the U.S.

By now, you probably (ideally) know to inspect on state and regional travel restrictions when preparing a journey. In certain parts of the nation, its also important to inspect– and follow– the limitations set by the Indigenous nations in the area. If you plan to check out any locations within Indigenous nations, inspect their COVID travel rules. The Navajo Nation Parks and Recreation are presently closed.

Photo: Ekaterina Pokrovsky (Shutterstock).

Around 229 of these are in Alaska, with the others spread across 35 other states. Each of these Indigenous nations are sovereign, suggesting that they are independent and their laws are separate from the state that their territory falls within.

Indigenous nations and COVID-19.
Like other communities of color throughout the United States, Indigenous nations have actually been disproportionately affected by COVID. Long before the pandemic, systemic health variations have indicated that residents of Indigenous nations die at greater rates than other Americans in numerous classifications, consisting of persistent liver disease and cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, unintentional injuries, assault/homicide, deliberate self-harm/suicide and chronic lower respiratory illness.
COVID-19 is no exception, with infection rates among Indigenous countries 3.5 times greater than among white people, including increased numbers of more youthful individuals contracting the infection, according to the Centers for Disease Control. To help slow the spread within their neighborhoods, Indigenous countries are exercising their sovereignty– in the kind of travel constraints– to safeguard their own health.

What is tribal sovereignty?
If your high school federal government class glossed (or completely skipped) over the lesson on tribal sovereignty, heres a fast refresher. According to the National Congress of American Indians, there are 574 federally acknowledged Indian Nations in the United States.

With the COVID-19 pandemic ushering in the return of the roadway trip, locations like parks and other natural wonders have actually seen a great deal of traffic. That includes lots of popular spots in Indigenous nations within the United States, like Antelope Canyon, Havasu Falls and Glacier National Park.
By now, you probably (hopefully) know to inspect on state and regional travel constraints when preparing a trip. In certain parts of the nation, its also essential to examine– and follow– the restrictions set by the Indigenous nations in the area.

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Comprehending travel constraints.
If you plan to go to any locations within Indigenous nations, inspect their COVID travel rules. The Navajo Nation Parks and Recreation are currently closed.
Sometimes, native countries COVID restrictions can be found on their sites, which holds true for the Blackfeet Nation, Havasupai Tribe and Hopi Tribe. The tourism websites for some states, like Montana, New Mexico and South Dakota, are also valuable resources, offering links to travel constraints in their Indigenous nations.
Pandemic or not, its a great idea to take the time to look into the laws of any Indigenous countries you prepare to visit, and be considerate while youre there.